via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

via vintageanchorbooks:
Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

typeverything:

Typeverything.com

3D Lettering with a Parallel pen & Pencil by Tolga Girgin.


But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

But the heart is not like a box that gets filled up. It expands in size the more you love. I’m different from you. This doesn’t make me love you any less, it actually makes me love you more.

(via shadyh)

dailydoseofbeautifulthings:

Love’s Plight

"To love at all is to be vulnerable" - C. S. Lewis

Speak | We’re Listening

Holy moly guys. Salomon Ligthelm has made another masterpiece. 

ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :) ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References
—-
We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 
The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.
The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 
We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.
The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 
—-
*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :)

ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NOISE References

—-

We wanted to create a space where a character experiences sensory overload. 

The idea is to create an abstract modern interpretation of what it looks like to have an assault on your senses. This will be done via graphical light projection in a room filled with smoke - giving the light and room a volumetric dimension.

The idea is to focus more on the character experiencing the movement of light as opposed to drawing too much attention to the graphics itself. 

We’ll be focussing on the movement of light across the character’s body - his eyes and ears and mouth.

The idea is too illustrate what our modern distraction are - our phones, the voices on twitter, instagram and the rest of the internet - all shouting for our attention. 

—-

*all this content was included in the initial pitch

Yes!!! My favorite creator is working on a new project :)

ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”


ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References
—-
The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of
the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because
of the assault on our senses in the present world. 
—-
1 Kings 19:11-13
Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 
Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 
After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper
When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.
Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”

ligthelm:

SPEAK WE’RE LISTENING | *NATURE References

—-

The idea is to contrast the reality of the noisy/chaotic world we live in with the silent sanctuary of

the presence of God that we actually do live in but that we are distracted from experiencing because

of the assault on our senses in the present world. 

—-

1 Kings 19:11-13

Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the Lord, but the 

Lord was not in the wind. After the wind there was an earthquake, but the Lord was not in the earthquake. 

After the earthquake came a fire, but the Lord was not in the fire. And after the fire came a gentle whisper

When Elijah heard it, he pulled his cloak over his face and went out and stood at the mouth of the cave.

Then a voice said to him “What are you doing here Elijah?”

Reception in Storm

I feel a bit out of place in this new city. I continue to listen and learn and soon enough it will begin to feel like home.

#vscocam #lifeingolden

Wednesday.

Future Project Experiment from Mark Lauman on Vimeo.

Experimenting with a few techniques for a future project

cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
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“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:
cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” —Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. —John Logan


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

cinephilearchive:

“An awareness of film history leads to a richer understanding of your art and further matures how you envision your film and how you approach the technical and artistic elements of filmmaking while staying true to your filmmaker’s style. Stanley Kubrick reinvents a visual sequence from Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ (1921) for ‘The Shining’ (1980). He substitutes the croquet mallet in Stephen King’s novel to an axe and draws upon the film’s simple but emotionally effective editing and cinematography. Sometimes pieces of great films echo in others, and though there may be many reasons for it, certainly one must be in order to share in the timeless experiences that cinema offers.

John Logan is one of Hollywood’s most prolific writers, having penned the scripts for films such as ‘Gladiator,’ ‘The Aviator,’ ‘Hugo,’ and ‘Skyfall.’ He is also an excellent source of insight for filmmakers. Courtesy of Casey Moore, Logan shares an essential piece of advice for ‘cinema artists.’ Watch and listen to John Logan speak to emerging artists about how they can change Hollywood, enjoy and compare Victor Sjöström’s ‘The Phantom Carriage’ and Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Shining.’” Edwin Adrian Nieves


Tell me your favorite shot from ‘Vertigo.’ Tell me your favorite Fred Astaire dance move and why. Tell me your favorite silent movie. Tell me the thing that made you be a cinema artist… Your responsibility is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art, and that means from the beginning of your art… You have to know where you belong because if you can’t with the ease of a Marty Scorsese refer just as easily to Italian Neorealism as you can Quentin Tarantino, you do not deserve to be in the room. John Logan

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

(via ajgartop)

My favorite wake up song

I got to meet some awesome people and do some art installation work when the #banabarona bus came through Dallas last weekend! So much fun!
Safe travels @chicadealeah